Apr 10 2013

The Great Peacock Roundup – Part II

Published by under Tidings from Gabriola Island

The great peacock roundup went better than expected. No one got scratched. The secret: blankets! Once a peacock’s head is covered, it immediately stops moving. Steve was able to grab one peacock at a time, wrap it up and place it in his van. They didn’t move while he drove them to their new home on the other side of the island. This morning, the mother of the flock, who has evaded capture so far, arrived on the property calling for her brood — a very sad sound indeed!

 

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Mar 31 2013

The Great Peacock Roundup – Part I

Published by under Tidings from Gabriola Island

Outsmarted again! A family on our island agreed to take our peacocks and came over today to try to catch them. They spread a large net on the ground, on top of which they put a black tarp and seeds. The peacocks circled the netting warily for a bit and then left the property without venturing onto the tarp. It was clear they knew something was up. They may have small heads but they are very, very clever birds. We’ve left the netting wrapped up near a pile of seeds, hoping that they’ll get used to the netting and ignore it after a while. At some point, when they are feeding, we will try to pull the netting over them. If that doesn’t work, perhaps the attempt to catch them might be enough to dissuade them from coming back!

Speaking of clever birds, earlier today a hummingbird flew to Doug’s office window – in the basement! – to notify Doug that it was back and missing its feeder. Naturally, I was given the immediate task of finding and filling the hummingbird feeder, which Doug then hung up in a new location. Yet another bird smart enough to get us to do its bidding! Since it is so smart, I’m sure it will find its feeder the next time it flies by.

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Mar 04 2013

Free-Range Peacocks & Other Friendly Fauna

Published by under Tidings from Gabriola Island

Feeding time for the peacocks

Doug feeding the “peaks”

This bucolic scene is deceptive. Because Doug has never encountered an animal he doesn’t want to feed, our property is overrun with pesky peacocks and pet deer.

Deer sunbathing

Friendly deer enjoying the sun outside our front door

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Dec 26 2010

And Then There Was One

Published by under Tidings from Gabriola Island

lonely goose on Gabriola

This lonely gander has lost his gaggle

During the past four years, this gander and his two male gaggle mates have terrorized our road.They staked out the intersection in front of their house and attacked anyone who ventured by: pedestrians, cyclists, even motorists. I gave up walking in their direction unless I was feeling particularly brave. Armed with a long stick to keep them at bay, I learned never to turn my back on them. That was the signal for an all-out attack. With necks and wings extended, honking furiously, they would fly up and try to bite as I ran screaming down the road.

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Nov 28 2009

Under Surveillance … by the Animal Kingdom

Published by under Tidings from Gabriola Island

Tiny Kali-gee is a fearless peacock chaserIt was not yet dawn. Our business line was ringing, so I automatically jumped out of bed and ran to answer the phone. Big mistake. Within seconds, Kali-gee, our geriatric outdoor cat, was howling Continue Reading »

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Aug 21 2009

Wild Animals? Hardly.

Published by under Tidings from Gabriola Island

Deer at table with adopted mother

Janet Schwartz of Ucluelet, Vancouver Island, is about to have her pet doe seized by misguided local wildlife authorities. This is a very sad tale indeed.  Ms. Schwartz rescued it as a fawn after it was orphaned five years. The black-tailed (mule) deer is entirely domesticated: it sleeps on a bed and eats at the table; it dances to music and gives kisses. Ms. Schwartz considers it the child she never had Continue Reading »

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